All posts filed under: Literary Badasses

Their stories, their works, their ideas

Pros and Cons, yo!

There is a distinct balance to everything — positives and negatives. I recalled the pro/con list concept today after catching an episode of Gilmore Girls. It’s about 12:44 am where I’m at and I’m wide awake. In the past few hours I’ve: donated to Poetry on the T and thanks to that I will have the opportunity to meet and learn from one of my new favorite poets Lloyd Schwartz – check out one of my favorite pieces of his: A True Poem become a member of the Mass Audubon Society — and so has my brother thanks to a belated graduation present from me 😛 applied to a couple of part-time jobs to support my new(er) yogic lifestyle. contemplated the meaning of life and realized there is an inherent juxtaposition between, well, everything Specifically, in the here and now, I recognize that there are two different types of insomnia: good insomnia and bad insomnia. Good insomnia involves insane productivity for mine and possibly others’ highest and best. Bad insomnia entails a downward shame spiral …

Sammy Bernstein, patriot & poet

Sammy Bernstein reminds me of the importance of Memorial Day in one of the most touching and true poems I’ve ever read about war, this poem came from a letter he wrote to his parents during the Battle of Iwo Jima, written during a battle Sammy never thought he’d make home alive. March 7th, 1945 on Iwo Jima Oh, I just saw a sight to see, A sight that will always live in me, And there they were, row on row, The graves of boy who gave their all, Here a cross and there a star, Try to see it, ‘cause there they are, A Catholic, Protestant, and a Jew, All American boys we once knew. And though you read, “so many thousand dead” You know not what you really read ‘Cause only those who see their graves Will ever know and be amazed. So to the ones who must receive A notice that they’ve been bereaved The boys who died for four great rights, We alive, for all time, must keep them bright. And when …

Emily Dickinson: The real woman in white

Musings on a visit to Emily Dickinson’s House Oh that frail woman in pale white of whom I knew so little about! While visiting a good friend of mine at UMass Amherst I knew I had to find out more about this mysterious creature whose poetry I had read albeit a few times but whose creativity, originality, and unusual work I was inspired by all the same. With the traffic in the area becoming thicker on a Sunday afternoon I had to take the “This was a Poet” tour as opposed to the other almost two-hour tour, yet I was not disappointed in the slightest. For seven dollars I got to hear the truth behind the fair woman, of whom we only know of physically by her only photograph. I learned a tremendous amount and am really grateful for the in-depth look into her life, her family, and her work. Emily Dickinson was born in 1830 in the house that was built by her grandfather; this is where she would live all her life. The …